Lynn Kirk

About Lynn Kirk

Lynn Kirk, a freelance writer and marketing consultant, has collaborated with Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden since 2002. She considers it a joy and privilege to write newspaper articles and member newsletters for such a top-rated (and utterly gorgeous!) public garden.

May 31st, 2018

Origami Art Visits RVA

Have you seen the Origami in the Garden sculpture exhibition at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden yet?  The outdoor origami art exhibition, which continues through September 30, is included with Garden admission and is free for Garden members. The second stop on a national tour, Origami in the Garden captures the delicate nature of a paper art form (origami) in […]

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Apr 29th, 2018

Mulch: Dead or Alive?

Grab your work gloves, wheelbarrow, and pitchfork. And don’t forget your sunscreen and water. It’s time, once again, to spread mulch! A light top-dressing will help spruce up the landscape as spring bursts forth.   Or perhaps this tradition isn’t for you? If the annual rite of transporting, lifting and spreading a load of mulch […]

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Apr 13th, 2018

Kevin Box Explores Origami in the Garden 

For fifteen years, Kevin Box ’s sculptures have been commissioned, collected, and displayed in prestigious art museums and private galleries around the world. Each sculpture is incredibly unique, beginning as a paper-inspired design that Box immortalizes through the lost-wax casting process. Though the Santa Fe sculptor welcomes the international acclaim, he also yearns to extend […]

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Mar 12th, 2018

Foodscaping

About a decade ago, Brie Arthur won a Yard of the Year award for her home landscape. That’s not unusual since she’s a professional horticulturist. What was surprising was the design. Apparently, her North Carolina homeowners’ association hadn’t noticed her “foodscaping” — planting various vegetables and herbs planted in plain sight, alongside ornamental shrubs and […]

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Feb 12th, 2018

Gardens Grow Community and More

10 steps for making your own urban garden in Richmond A vacant lot, neighborhood square and school courtyard have something in common. All have potential to be transformed into vibrant community gardens. Duron Chavis readily recognizes the possibility, having launched 12 community gardens in urban areas of Richmond and Petersburg. “None of this is new, […]

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Jan 17th, 2018

2018 Gardening Trends

Society’s 24/7 connectedness, public unrest and hectic schedules are taking their toll. In fact, the World Health Organization predicted anxiety will oust obesity as the No. 1 health issue by 2030. So, if stress relief and wellness are your New Year’s resolutions, consider a return to nature. 2018 gardening trends point in this direction. “Being […]

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Dec 12th, 2017

Celebrate National Poinsettia Day

December 12 is National Poinsettia Day, honoring Euphorbia pulcherrima: the country’s most popular holiday plant, according to retail sales. Purchase one locally, and chances are it originated in Ethiopia or Costa Rica, some 6,000 to 7,000 miles away. Cary Gouldin, one of three Richmond brothers who own Strange’s, shared how poinsettia cuttings (also called slips) are […]

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Nov 24th, 2017

So Berry Beautiful!

Berries boast a full range of hues this time of year, proving Nature’s color obsession isn’t limited to spring blooms, summer sunsets and autumn leaves. During winter, she brightens landscapes through berries, which are color-packed fruits of some ground covers, shrubs and trees. Though typically tiny, they don’t disappoint. Some boast firecracker reds, blistering oranges […]

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Oct 15th, 2017

Pick a Peck of Pumpkins

Carve it. Craft it. Cook it. Pumpkin is so versatile, it deserves the season’s spotlight. Not only are pumpkins inexpensive, readily available and striking as autumnal decor, some varieties are as nutritious as they are delicious. The flesh and seeds of edible pumpkins are packed with fiber, as well as vitamins A and C. With […]

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Oct 15th, 2017

Volunteers: Helpers with Heart

They began working last spring. They brought with them energy, creativity and ingenuity. They never asked for pay. And many will keep working through January! “They” are Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s highly valued volunteers who help bring Dominion Energy GardenFest of Lights to life, year after year. Meet a few today. Then, watch for additional spotlights in the […]

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Sep 20th, 2017

Beware Invasive Species

Don’t let invasive species fool you. They look innocent, but don’t behave. Nor do they stop growing, spreading and reproducing. The culprits are certain species of aggressive non-native vines, trees, shrubs, herbaceous plants and grasses. Some look exotic, promising to add pizazz to your landscape. Others serve a purpose, such as ground cover, erosion control […]

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Sep 5th, 2017

Gardening Advice for Late Summer

 (Gardeners, don’t quit now!) It’s this time of the year that gardeners August gardens’ towering tomato plants eke out their final harvests. Yellowing cucumber vines wildly wander. Herbs go to seed, while tuckered flowers fade from glory. And all is accompanied by Richmond’s incessant heat, haze, and humidity. No wonder folks want to run from […]

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Jul 14th, 2017

Success with Succulents

“Succulents are not really beautiful. They’re weird. ” Mike Wallace’s candor about succulent plants stems from 40 years of studying and collecting them. A self-taught succulent guru and certified horticulturist, he became fascinated with the ornamentals while living in Tucson, Ariz., where they thrive. The word “succulent” comes from the Latin word “sucus,” which means […]

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Jun 13th, 2017

Container Plantings

Landscape need a punch of color? Front entry desperate for a bit of cheer? Or perhaps your spring annuals are withering in the heat? Beth Burrell, garden designer and consultant, suggests a simple solution: DIY container plantings filled with summer annuals and perennials. Not only will they brim with color, texture and interest. They will […]

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May 16th, 2017

Save the Trees

“I wish people would put as much emphasis on their trees as their lawns,” said Joel Koci, a certified arborist with the Urban Forestry Extension of Virginia State University. “Trees are much more ecologically advantageous.” According to Koci, man’s actions and lack of knowledge are two of the greatest threats to trees. “People pressure”—such as […]

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