FLOURISH
CELEBRATING OUR GARDEN AND ITS BEAUTY

June – October, 2024

2024 marks the Garden’s 40th Anniversary and to celebrate our horticulturists have created new, dazzling displays throughout the Garden. This year’s summer plantings will become lush as the season progresses through fall, with surprises and vignettes to discover in four iconic areas.

2024 marca el 40 aniversario del Jardín y para celebrarlo nuestros horticultores han creado nuevas y deslumbrantes exposiciones por todo el Jardín. Las plantaciones de verano de este año se volverán exuberantes a medida que avance la estación hasta el otoño, con sorpresas y viñetas por descubrir en cuatro zonas emblemáticas.

VICTORIAN SPLENDOR

Location: Grace Arents Garden

The Victorian Era was a time of great plant exploration and collection. During the 19th century, British imperialism and exotic plant hunting reached a peak. Thanks to new technology in glass manufacturing and coal-fired boilers, large, heated glasshouses grew in popularity and collecting rare specimen plants from around the world became a status symbol with Victorian elites. Plants that we now consider garden staples such as camellias became popular in gardens across the West due to Victorian plant enthusiasm. This era of plant exploration not only shaped the landscapes of Victorian gardens but also laid the foundation for modern botanical conservation efforts and the global exchange of plant species. However, there are a lot of lessons learned from these activities; not all good!

 

ESPLENDOR VICTORIANO: 

REDESCUBRIENDO LOS ENCANTOS BOTÁNICOS DE UNA ÉPOCA 

DISEÑADO POR ELIZABETH FOGEL 

La Era Victoriana fue una época de gran exploración y recolección de plantas. Durante el siglo XIX, el imperialismo británico y la caza de plantas exóticas alcanzaron su apogeo. Gracias a las nuevas tecnologías de fabricación de vidrio y a las calderas de carbón, los grandes invernaderos con calefacción se hicieron muy populares y coleccionar especímenes raros de plantas de todo el mundo se convirtió en un símbolo de estatus para las élites victorianas. Plantas que hoy consideramos básicas en jardinería, como las camelias, se hicieron populares en los jardines de todo Occidente gracias al entusiasmo victoriano por las plantas. Esta era de exploración vegetal no sólo dio forma a los paisajes de los jardines victorianos, sino que también sentó las bases de los esfuerzos modernos de conservación botánica y del intercambio mundial de especies vegetales. Sin embargo, hay muchas lecciones aprendidas de estas actividades; ¡no todas buenas!  

En nuestro esfuerzo por ser mejores administradores del mundo natural, te invitamos a leer algunas de estas lecciones en esta exposición.  

Elizabeth Fogel, Image by Graham Copland

ELIZABETH FOGEL
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF HORTICULTURE

Elizabeth Fogel has a long career in public gardens and natural resource conservation, including Longwood Gardens, US National Arboretum, and the US Peace Corps. She loves designing for both aesthetics and ecological values. Through working at a botanical garden, she appreciates the opportunity to educate the public about plants and their important role in sustaining all life.

Ravenea rivularis – Majesty Palm
Euphorbia 'Breathless White'
Zinnia Zahara Rasberry
Catheranthus Blockbuster Blue
Angelonia Archangel White
Pentas Lucky Star Lavendar
Salvia 'Wendy's Wish'
Duranta Gold Edge
Caladium Spring Fling
Lantana White Cascade
Cuphea Cupid White Improved
Salvia ''Amante'
BEGONIA obliqua Maribel
DAHLIA Mystic Fantasy
FUCHSIA Mrs. J. D. Fredericks
GERANIUM Black Velvet Appleblossom
PELARGONIUM Mini Karmine
FERN Cyathea cooperi Australian Tree Fern
FERN Microsorium musifolium Crocodyllus
FERN Nephrolepis exaltata Tiger
Lantana Landmark Rose Glow
Lantana Variegated Lavender Cascascade
Clerodendrum incisum 'Musical Notes'
ABUTILON x Moonchimes
COLOCASIA esculenta Hawaiian Punch
GOSSYPIUM herbaceum Variegated Albe Red
PSEUDERANTHEMUM atropurpureum
RUSSELIA equisitiformis Candlelight Yellow
ALOCASIA odora Maui Splash

 

SHADED SERENITY

Location: Flagler Perennial Garden

Shade plants are often overlooked in garden design but are important for the lushness and tranquility they bring to spaces. They offer environmental benefits too, from helping prevent soil erosion to cooling and conserving water. Shade gardens also contribute to biodiversity by supporting various wildlife. By incorporating these resilient and versatile plants into our outdoor spaces, we can cultivate beautiful, sustainable landscapes that nourish the soul and support the health of the planet.

 

 

SERENIDAD SOMBREADA: 

UN DESPLIEGUE DE VERDE 

DISEÑADO POR MEGAN LACEY 

Las plantas de sombra suelen pasarse por alto en el diseño de jardines, pero son importantes por la exuberancia y tranquilidad que aportan a los espacios. Además, aportan beneficios medioambientales, desde la prevención de la erosión del suelo hasta la refrigeración y conservación del agua. Los jardines de sombra también contribuyen a la biodiversidad al favorecer la vida silvestre. Al incorporar estas plantas resistentes y versátiles a nuestros espacios exteriores, podemos cultivar paisajes bellos y sostenibles que nutren el alma y favorecen la salud del planeta.   

Hay mucha creatividad y magia en un jardín de sombra. Esperamos que nuestra exposición te inspire y te convenza para que no tales los árboles de tu jardín. 

Megan Lacey
Horticulture Section Leader

 

Begonia 'Miss Montreal'
Muhlenbeckia axillaris
Dichondra argentea Silver Fall
Heuchera villosa Bronze Wave
Euphorbia hypericifolia Breathless White
Carex appalachica
Nephrolepsis obliterata

TROPICAL TREASURES

Location: Central Garden

Tropical plants, with their vibrant colors and lush foliage, bring a touch of paradise to any landscape. Beyond their beauty, they are resilient champions against climate change, thriving in warm, humid climates. Their unique adaptations make them well-suited to withstand shifting environmental conditions. In a changing world, they offer hope by creating sustainable landscapes that can endure. Whether adorning a botanical garden, enhancing indoor spaces, or gracing outdoor landscapes, tropical plants not only dazzle the eye but also serve as resilient ambassadors of nature’s adaptability in the face of environmental change.

 

TESOROS TROPICALES: 

EXPLORANDO LA FLORA EXÓTICA DE TIERRAS LEJANAS 

DISEÑADO POR DANNY COX, DEAN DIETRICH Y JAYTON HOWARD

Las plantas tropicales, con sus vibrantes colores y exuberante follaje, aportan un toque paradisíaco a cualquier paisaje. Más allá de su belleza, son campeonas resistentes al cambio climático y prosperan en climas cálidos y húmedos. Sus adaptaciones únicas las hacen idóneas para soportar condiciones ambientales cambiantes. En un mundo cambiante, ofrecen esperanza al crear paisajes sostenibles que pueden perdurar. Ya sea adornando un jardín botánico, realzando espacios interiores o adornando paisajes exteriores, las plantas tropicales no sólo deslumbran a la vista, sino que también sirven como embajadoras resistentes de la adaptabilidad de la naturaleza frente al cambio medioambiental.   

 

Aprender sobre el cambio climático y la adaptación es esencial en estos tiempos. Esta exposición, así como otras partes de la programación de nuestro Jardín, pretende educar a nuestra comunidad para crear un mundo mejor para las generaciones futuras. 

Danny Cox, Vice President of Horticulture at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

DANNY COX
VICE PRESIDENT, HORTICULTURE

A leader in public horticulture for more than a decade, Danny Cox oversees the Horticulture Department, setting the vision for the curation, growth, and maintenance of botanical collections. He combines lifelong passions for plants and people by creating innovative landscape displays that inspire and delight visitors and celebrate Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s diverse membership.

Diversity is important to Dean Dietrich. Dean is shown watering the Central Garden where he is the Horticulturist.. Image by Graham Copeland

DEAN DIETRICH
Ex-Horticulture Section Leader

“People ask me where I get my ideas. I follow designers around the globe and read their books, Instagram and blog posts. Their designs inspire me. Unique plants do, too. We’re furthering our botanical collections here at the Garden. We collect them because they’re interesting [and] saving germplasm can also help save a species.”

Dean has accepted a position at Longwood Gardens overseeing a part of their new conservatory.

Jayton Howard

Jayton Howard
Conservatory Horticulturist

Jayton Howard grew up in Oregon working at his mother’s flower shop, had the privilege of studying horticulture in Australia where he also managed a garden shop for 5 years, then moved to Hawaii to specialize in tropical growing where he managed wholesale nursery operations as well as a cacao and coffee farm. Now he is here in Richmond at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden as the Conservatory Horticulturist where he gets to keep the tropical lifestyle alive.

Neorgelia ‘Chile verde’

Neoreglia ‘Fireball’

Neoreglia ‘Super Fireball’

Bacopa sp.

Hemigraphis alternata

Muehlenbeckia complexa

Echeveria ‘Perle Von Nürnberg’

Cuphea 'Cupid Purple'​

NATURAL CONNECTION

Location: Sensory Garden

Plants are the unsung heroes of our everyday lives, silently working to improve our well-being in countless ways. From the air we breathe to the food we eat, plants play a crucial role in sustaining human life on Earth. Plants give us food, and are also used to make medicine, as well as everyday items like clothing. They are part of traditions and rituals of cultures around the world, they heal us and create an intergenerational connection.
In addition to their physical benefits, plants have a profound impact on our mental and emotional well-being. The sight and scent of plants evoke feelings of calmness and relaxation, providing a natural antidote to the pressures of modern life. In essence, plants are not just passive inhabitants of our world; they are active contributors to our health, happiness, and overall quality of life.

 

CONEXIÓN NATURAL: 

CELEBRANDO EL PAPEL DE LAS PLANTAS EN NUESTRA VIDA COTIDIANA 

DISEÑADO POR ELIZABETH FOGEL 

Las plantas son los héroes anónimos de nuestra vida cotidiana, ya que trabajan silenciosamente para mejorar nuestro bienestar de innumerables maneras. Desde el aire que respiramos hasta los alimentos que comemos, las plantas desempeñan un papel crucial en el sustento de la vida humana en la Tierra. Las plantas nos dan de comer, y también se utilizan para fabricar medicinas, así como artículos cotidianos como la ropa. Forman parte de tradiciones y rituales de culturas de todo el mundo, nos curan y crean una conexión intergeneracional.    

Además de sus beneficios físicos, las plantas tienen un profundo impacto en nuestro bienestar mental y emocional. La vista y el olor de las plantas evocan sentimientos de calma y relajación, proporcionando un antídoto natural contra las presiones de la vida moderna. En esencia, las plantas no son meros habitantes pasivos de nuestro mundo; contribuyen activamente a nuestra salud, felicidad y calidad de vida en general.   

Tómate tu tiempo para interactuar con la naturaleza y crear un vínculo más estrecho con ella. Te invitamos a probar más, aprender más, utilizar más materiales naturales e integrar más plantas en tu vida cotidiana. 

Elizabeth Fogel, Image by Graham Copland

ELIZABETH FOGEL
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF HORTICULTURE

Elizabeth Fogel has a long career in public gardens and natural resource conservation, including Longwood Gardens, US National Arboretum, and the US Peace Corps. She loves designing for both aesthetics and ecological values. Through working at a botanical garden, she appreciates the opportunity to educate the public about plants and their important role in sustaining all life.

Grown in the Garden's greenhouse:
Petroselinum crispum – Parsley (Moss Curled)
Abelmoschus esculentus – Okra (Lee)
Hibiscus sabdariffa – Roselle (Thai Red)
Cosmos sulphureus – Cosmos (Memories of Mona)
Luffa acutangula – Luffa (Dishcloth Gourd)
Lagenaria siceraria – Calabash (Birdhouse Gourd)
Zinnia elegans – Zinnia (Queen Lime Bush)
Cucumis metuliferus – African Horned Melon
Lantana Landmark Rose Glow
Catharanthus Tatoo Raspberry
Gomphrena Strawberry Fields
Tagetes patula Hot Pak Orange
pineapple
Basil, African Blue
Lavender ‘Goodwin Creek’
Rosemary, Gorizia
Mint, Mojito
Moringa
Scented Geranium Attar of Roses
Bitter Melon
Shirogoma White Sesame
Black Madras Ornamental Rice
Curry
Sage, Clary
Lemon Verbena
Stevia
Zinnia, Benary’s Giant Mix
Pepper, Shishito
Tagetes patula – Marigold (Safari Tangerine)
Cynara scolymus – Artichoke (Green Globe)
Hordeum vulgare – Barley (Purple Karma)
Zea mays – Corn (Hopi Turquoise) and (Pink Flour)

Flourish: 40th Anniversary Celebration Classes, Tours & Lectures

This year marks four decades of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, and we’re celebrating for the whole year with favorite events as well as exciting new ones. Through our 40th Anniversary theme, “Flourish,” our goal is tohonor the work that has come before, celebrate where we are now, and look forward to the transformational changes kicking off in 2024.Our anniversary programming includes special classes, tours, and a Speaker Series highlighting the Garden’s past, present, and future. 

Learn More

Membership Includes Unlimited Flourish Visits

Become a member and you can enjoy all of the Flourish excitement and events for one low price.

Join Now