Feb 11th, 2021

Citizen Science in Your Backyard!

Calling all birders, bird enthusiasts, and even the bird curious. The annual Great Backyard Bird Count is quickly approaching, and YOU have an opportunity to participate in something global and meaningful right in your very own backyard. Anytime February 12-15,  2021, take as little as 15-minutes to count some feathered friends in your backyard, or […]

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Feb 10th, 2021

Instagram GardenFest Contest

The GardenFest Instagram contest has become one of our favorite holiday traditions. It’s a wonderful way for us to reflect on a season of festivities, joy and see how our visitors and members experience Dominion Energy GardenFest of Lights. Can you believe we’ve been doing this contest for eight years now? We are so excited […]

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Feb 9th, 2021

Garden’s New President & CEO: Brian Trader

I can’t think of a time when our society has needed the respite and healing of gardens and nature more. This is just one of the many reasons I’m honored and humbled to join Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. I started as President and CEO on January 4, and have spent my first few weeks getting to know […]

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Feb 6th, 2021

Tree-of-Heaven: A “Dirty Dozen” Plant

This week we are featuring tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) as our “Dirty Dozen” plant. While this tree may have been used in folk medicine or even as an insecticide, it is diabolical for our Virginia native ecosystems. Tree-of-Heaven Ailanthus altissima is a member of the quassia (Simaroubaceae) family (PDF). This small to medium-sized tree is dioecious, […]

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Feb 6th, 2021

Crape Myrtle: Pruning

February is the time of year you may notice stark “stubs” of crape myrtles in parking lots and other areas around town. Often crape myrtle is so harshly pruned only trunks are left, with the top half of the tree hacked off. The look is so prevalent that many believe this is the correct way […]

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Feb 1st, 2021

Oriental Bittersweet: A “Dirty Dozen” Plant

This week’s Dirty Dozen plant is oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). Since it is still available in the horticultural trade, we hope that the following information will convince you not to buy this plant. Oriental Bittersweet Celastrus orbiculatus is a member of the bittersweet family (Celastraceae). This deciduous, perennial, woody vine can grow up to 60 […]

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Jan 29th, 2021

Diverse Books for Children: Why it Matters

Diverse Books Did you have a favorite book as a child? Take a moment to think about that book and how you felt connected to it. For me, it was Corduroy by Don Freeman. I spent a lot of my childhood at Shaw Library in the Shaw neighborhood in Northwest, Washington, D.C. That library is […]

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Jan 24th, 2021

Porcelain Berry: A “Dirty Dozen” Plant

This week’s featured member of the “Dirty Dozen” is Ampelopsis glandulosa var. brevipedunculata, commonly known as porcelain berry or amur peppervine. Most horticulture staff agree that this is the most pervasive of all invasive plants that we are currently battling at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. Porcelain Berry Ampelopsis glandulosa var. brevipedunculata (syn. Ampelopsis brevipedunculata), is […]

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Jan 15th, 2021

Chinese Privet: A “Dirty Dozen” Plant

This week’s featured member of the “Dirty Dozen” is Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense). Though several southern states, including Virginia, have recognized this plant in their invasive species lists or laws,  unfortunately, Chinese privet remains a commonly sold and planted ornamental shrub. Keep reading to find out why you should stop planting it and how to […]

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Jan 12th, 2021

Mulberry Weed: A “Dirty Dozen” Plant

This week’s “Dirty Dozen” plant is mulberry weed (Fatoua villosa). In recent years, we have observed this plant creeping into our garden beds at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. So far, it has slid under the radar in Virginia, and only California, Alabama and Georgia include this plant in their invasive species lists or laws. We […]

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Jan 4th, 2021

Japanese Stiltgrass: A “Dirty Dozen” Plant

Last week, we shared that we will be covering the top 12 worst invasive plant species that we encounter at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden — the “Dirty Dozen,”  This week, we are introducing the first species on our list: Japanese stiltgrass.  Please note that we have not ranked the Dirty Dozen in any way, as […]

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Dec 22nd, 2020

Invasive Plants: The “Dirty Dozen”

Meet the Plants Over the next few weeks, we will be introducing 12 of the most problematic invasive plants that you’ll encounter in Central Virginia. Unfortunately, we also have to battle these even at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden! While our list is by no means comprehensive for Virginia, Richmond, or even our Garden, we have […]

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Dec 15th, 2020

Christmas Cactus: A Case of Mistaken Identity

My friend Carla knows a lot about plants. Ever since the day her mother found dirt in her diaper, she’s been a gardener. When she told me she couldn’t figure out why her Christmas cactus bloomed at Thanksgiving every year, I knew something was up. “Maybe it’s a Thanksgiving cactus,” someone suggested. She thought they […]

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Nov 16th, 2020

Yaupon Holly: The Forgotten Beverage

The yaupon holly shrub looks commonplace. It is not flashy or fancy. It doesn’t even have the prickly leaves we normally associate with hollies. If you walk by it without noticing it, like many of our visitors do, you would be in good company. It is often used as shrubs in residential areas and it’s […]

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Nov 6th, 2020

Garden or GardenFest Zoom Backgrounds

What better way to celebrate nature than with a beautiful scene from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden as your Zoom background at your next work meeting!  We all need a bit more beauty and peace and this is a simple way to bring it into your world while supporting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. During this unprecedented […]

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