Feed on
Posts
Comments

by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 

Jonah Holland, Don Garber, Mark Herzog

Pr & Marketing Coordinator Jonah Holland, center, with Don Garber, president of the Sports Backers Board of Directors, right and Mark Herzog, HDL Senior Vice President of Corporate and Governmental Affairs, left. Photo by Jesse Peters, Backlight Photography.

Did you know that Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is Active RVA certified?  We are!

Last week, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, along with  25 Richmond region schools and 42 corporations were honored with an Active RVA Fitness Award and certification.  I was thrilled to represent the Garden and accept the award, which will be on display in the Garden’s Lora Robins Library.

At the awards ceremony Richmond SportsBackers treated us to a healthy (of course!) lunch and then some fun pirate-themed movement activities with Greater Richmond Fit4Kids,  educators (who typically work with First Graders).  I was happy to eat my fruit salad “dessert” first, and only got mildly skeptical looks from my table “mates.”  I have to admit I was a bit skeptical when activity leaders Nellie Knight, Wellness Integration Specialist at Bellwood Elementary, and Jenny Long-Innes,Wellness Integration Specialist at Elizabeth Scott Elementary told us that we were about to do a pirate-themed activity. But, they were fabulous as they led us through ‘Ship Wrecked’, a game they use with elementary-age kids to both teach SOLs and keep them moving.  Then, guest Speaker, Rich Conte, Director and Chief Wonder Officer at the Science Museum of Virginia told us about the Science Museum’s Boost exhibit, which focuses on mind, body and lifestyle.

Personally, I left the Active RVA luncheon feeling inspired. Our Northside neighbor (and namesake) Ginter Park Elementary School was honored as the outstanding Active RVA school. (You can check out all the great things they are doing, including a before-school running club,  in the video below. )  Our friends over at CarMax  were honored as the 2014 Outstanding Company of the Year. Carmax knows how important healthy eating is too. In 2011 the CarMax Foundation gave  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden a $15,000 grant that helped to fund the Community Kitchen Garden where we grow thousands of pounds of fresh vegetables for FeedMore each year.

So as you’ve probably guessed, fitness is really important to the Garden — staying active is part of our culture.  I’m sure you’ve heard about our Nudge app, that is free for all Garden Members, but did you know that we have Yoga in the Garden, Tai Chi and wonderful walking paths too? I didn’t even mention the best excercise of all —  gardening! There are so many ways you can get fit in the Garden.

Want to learn more? Look for an article in the Henrico Citizen later this week on the Active RVA lunch.  And in April, Richmond Magazine will publish a special section in their Top Docs issue, all about Active RVA. Also, if you want to sign up your own school or organization to be Active RVA Certified, their website is a great place to start.

by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 

Crocuses

Don’t miss these beauties, you’ll find them just to your right after you pass through the Robins Visitor Center. The courtyard there is somewhat protected from the cold, so these bloom just a bit earlier.

Spring is on the way! A single Crocus tommasinianus 'Lilac Beauty' and the Lace House.

Spring is on the way! A single Crocus tommasinianus ‘Lilac Beauty’ and the Lace House.

Hellebore

Hellebores are just starting to bloom!

Galanthus Elwesii

Galanthus Elwesii or snow drops. I love how these bloom when we need them most — in January and February.

Narcissus - Rijnveld's Early Sensation

Narcissus – Rijnveld’s Early Sensation

 Crocus tommasinianus 'Lilac Beauty'

Crocus tommasinianus ‘Lilac Beauty’.

by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 

Julie Moir Messervy

Julie Moir Messervy inspiring a packed house during the Winter Symposium & CVNLA Short Course at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.

This morning I spent a few minutes listening to a horticultural rock star of our time.  Julie Moir Messervy spoke to a full house of green business owners and their staffs, landscape architects and designers, Master Gardeners, seasoned home gardeners, and horticulturists (including most of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s hort staff), during the Winter Symposium and CVNLA Short Course Sublime + Sustainable: Horticultural Artistry in Action.  I could feel excitment in the room, a sense of enthusiastic desire for knowledge and inspiration from one of the nation’s most well-regarded and prolific authors on the topic of garden design.   Messervy’s  newest take on garden design is design that incorporates sustainability as a central feature. It’s garden design for the 21st century, incorporating the idea of “new homesteading”  or making  our homes a place where we not only embrace the paradise that is our outdoor space, but more than that, making it a model of sustainability, using vegetable gardens, solar panels, drying yards, rainwater collections systems and more as an imaginative way  to create a nest for the next generation.

Green roofs, she pointed out, used to be filled with hardy plants like Sedum, but with the evolution of better technology in both the roof membrane and how living roofs  are designed,  Messervy has seen many more gardeners putting vegetables on their roofs, something that wasn’t easily done just a few years ago.  When planning  outdoor spaces it helps to have an expert like  Messervy  to  help you think about details that might not otherwise come into consideration.  For example, she notes that south-westerly winds cool you in the summer, so you would want to be strategic not to block them with plantings.

Ever heard of a Drying Yard? Me neither! One of the greatest things you can do for the environment, Messervy says,  is to use your own energy, or utilize nature’s energy instead of using fossil fuels. With a little strategic planning you can dry your laundry outside, using only the sun’s natural energy. “There is nothing NOT beautiful about these,” Messervy says, showing a slide image filled with perfectly spaced  pants hanging on a clothesline.  Drying Yards aren’t new ideas of course, but  in today’s age of convenience, most people don’t think about drying their clothes outside, the natural way. It practically seems revolutionary.  And why not use a rake instead of using a loud leaf blower? Your neighbors will thank you for not creating obnoxious noise and your body with thank you for it too.

If you missed  the symposium, consider checking out her new book, Landscaping Ideas that Work.  Or, if you are tech savvy do-it-yourselfer, check out her app, Home Outside Palette app for iPhone and iPad (available soon for Android).

How do I know Messervy is a horticultural rock star? When you’ve designed a garden with Yo-Yo Ma, you certainly are!   At the Toronto Music Garden in Canada, Messervy’s challenge was “How do you create a garden to a piece of music? — Bach’s Suite No. 1 in G Major for unaccompanied cello, BWV 1007  ”The ideas were all in the music — I just recreated what I heard” Messervy says.   Imagine, a garden with prelude,  allemande, courante, sarabande, minuets, and gigue. If nothing else it inspires me to rethink how I want to design my own garden, pushing the limits of what I thought was possible this does.  Maybe I’ll design my front yard to Radiohead’s Transmutation and my Back Yard to Dan Mangan’s  Leaves, Trees, Forest.  Now, if I can just get my neighborhood association to allow a Drying Yard….

by Helen Wallace MacDonald, Board Liaison & Major Gifts Assistant, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 

Virginia Opera tenor Michael Kuhn serenades Mrs. Cochrane with "Only A Rose" in honor of her 98th birthday.

Virginia Opera tenor Michael Kuhn serenades Mrs. Cochrane with “Only A Rose” in honor of her 98th birthday.

Turning 98 years old is a noteworthy accomplishment, never mind painting 40+ pieces of beautiful artwork in one year. So goes the life of Mrs. Louise Cochrane. An incredibly practiced artist, our graceful friend once again outdid herself not only with a supreme showing of this past year’s work, but also with a gathering of celebrants at a beautiful January soiree. The weather held up, though quite cold, and everyone came to toast Mrs. Cochrane and her husband while enjoying three harpists, a pianist and a very special tenor by the name of Michael Kuhn from the Virginia Opera. He sang, “Only A Rose” from operetta “The Vagabond King” because one of Mrs. Cochrane’s paintings is titled as such. She loves the song, and of course, the flower.

Harwood and Louise Cochrane with their "Cakes By Graham", custom made from the artist's paintings

Harwood and Louise Cochrane with their “Cakes By Graham”, custom made from the artist’s paintings

Her artwork is truly masterful, and should be seen. On display in Ginter Gallery II and the Robins Library in the Education and Library Complex until March 2nd, these paintings convey a thriving relationship to gardens with the woman who lives life like a plenary bloom.

Michael Kuhn presents Louise Cochrane with a single birthday rose

Please come to Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden and see what is remarkably more than only a rose

www.louisecochrane.com

by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 

Anthurium 'Miami Beauty' photo by Jonah Holland

Heart-shaped Anthurium ‘Miami Beauty’ photo by Jonah Holland

Thinking about what to get your true love for Valentine’s Day? Instead of a bouquet of flowers, why not get her a whole garden of flowers!
A gift-box membership will give your sweetie a whole year of blooms, activities and special exhibits like Butterflies LIVE!, Mother’s Day weekend events, Flowers After 5, RoseFest,  free Member Nights at Dominion GardenFest of Lights and many more. Not sure if she likes roses, orchids, tulips, lilies or daffodils best? Give them all to her! Here’s what’s in bloom by month at the Garden.

Did you know that  for $20 you can add an unlimited guest pass to your Membership that allows you a free guest every visit?!  Don’t forget Grandma!

by guest blogger Amanda Godbold Payne, Blue Sky Fund 

Editor’s Note:  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden  was honored to be a part of Blue Sky’s pilot program for 7th grade Explorers program, the students participated as part of the Grow Works program that includes education and service. The volunteer component allow the Garden to waive the admission fee for these participants.

7th grade students from Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School  explore the Conservatory.

7th grade students from Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School explore the Conservatory.

In December, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden partnered with Blue Sky Fund to bring 7th grade students from Franklin Military Academy and Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School to the botanical garden as part of Blue Sky’s Explorers program.  The Explorers program works with 11 different  Richmond City Public Schools to provide hands-on, experiential learning field trips at various parks, farms, and other open spaces in the Richmond area.  The Blue Sky participants attended the Garden via the Grow Works program, an opportunity that involves education and service; the volunteer component allows the educational program’s fees to be compensated. This is a great opportunity for middle schools and high schools who might be lacking funds for field trips.

exp_dec1

Kids from Richmond’s MLK Jr. Middle School work on tree identification and classification as they explore the botanical garden.

Blue Sky’s Explorers program aims to support teachers by providing SOL-relevant experiences and lessons that augment their classroom teaching.  Last school year, the Explorers program reached over 600 students at nine schools and saw a significant increase in the average science grades of the participants. This school year, the Explorers program expanded from only 3rd grades to adding 5th and 7th grade field trips as well.  During their visit, the students focused on tree identification and classification as they explored Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.  Nicki, the Garden’s Youth Programs Developer explains: “I think horticulture is an especially great volunteer opportunity — it creates social interaction, team-building, connects community, offers physical fitness, and can be meditative as well as therapeutic….Movement stimulates memory so volunteering paired with an educational program is a great match.”

Blue Sky seeks to invest in young lives through on-going outdoor programming. These 7th grade Explorer students will be given the opportunity to continue their learning in a pilot summer program focused on STEM job training, or to join a weekly Outdoor Adventure Club, or eventually to go on wilderness trips in our leadership training program.

Blue Sky is on a mission to provide transformational experiences for urban youth through outdoor education. We will give every young person the opportunity to discover themselves by actively engaging the natural world. Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s passion is connecting people and plants to improve communities.  Like-minded organizations working together to make Richmond a better place — it doesn’t get any better.

 

 

by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 

Tyler Darden photo of bee & blossoms

Bee and cherry blossoms. Photo by Tyler Darden.

Did you know that you can sign up for Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s enews to get updates on what’s happening at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden?  In our enewsletter, we highlight what’s in bloom,  special events like A Million Blooms, Mother’s Day, Flowers After 5 and more. We’ll send you reminders about opportunities like our FREE admission day on July 4th.  Plus, you’ll be the first to know when class and course registration opens online, and you’ll be able to sign up for our Spring Break Garden Adventures Camp and  Green Adventures Summer Camp before they fill.

Sign up now if you’d like to get these updates!

 

Photos by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, & Beth Monroe, Director of PR & Marketing,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 

snowy conservatory

snow in the Asian Valley.

Asian Valley reflections.

snowy fern.

Fern in snow.

Snow drops (Galanthus elwesii)

Snow drops (Galanthus elwesii) in snow.

by Jonah Holland, PR & Marketing Coordinator, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 

Dendrobium Tanida Two-Tone in the Conservatory.

Dendrobium Tanida Two-Tone in the Conservatory.

Laeliocattleya Gold Digger 'Orchid Jungle'

Laeliocattleya Gold Digger ‘Orchid Jungle’

Camellia. Photo by Don Williamson Photography.

Camellia. Photo by Don Williamson Photography.

Narcissus 'Rijnveld's Early Sensation'

Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’ spotted in early January 2014 in Flagler Garden.

Have we got a treat for you! Starting today, and running through the end of the weekend, admission to Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is completely FREE! If you’ve never been to the Garden before, this is a perfect chance to come see what we are all about.  We have friendly staff ready to answer your botanical questions and our Visitor Services Staff  would love to tell you some highlights of things to see on your visit. If you are the do-it-yourself type, you can see what’s in bloom by month  on our website.  Yes, we have a few blooms outside even in January! Some of the blooms you may see in winter include Hellebore, Camellia, Parrotia, snow drops (Galanthus elwesii) and edgeworthia.

You might even see a few early-blooming daffodils!

Orchids, cyclamen, paperwhites, amaryllis and many more blooms await you in the cozy Conservatory.  Or go on a hunt for interesting bark, dried seed pods and berries all over the Garden.  Our garden paths are wonderful place to walk and think.  If you are a birder look for our birding trail brochure too.  Don’t forget  to take a break by the fireplace in the Library Reading Room where it’s warm and cozy. bird trail brochure

witch hazel

Witch hazel

Tree bark

Tree bark — interesting any time of year. Photo by Tyler Darden

snow drops!

Snow drops!

If you can’t make it this week, don’t worry! We’re running a winter special — January 20 – February 28. Adults and seniors are $5 / children are $4.
Also, plan on eating before or after your trip to the Garden. The Garden Cafe is closed this week (January 14-19) for routine maintenance. The Robins Tea House is also temporarily closed during this time, the Tea House will re-open in spring, date to be announced.  Please note that the Garden Shop is closed for inventory January 14-23, 2014. 

 

by Lynn Kirk, Public Relations Writer,  Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, reprinted with permission from the Richmond Times-Dispatch

Welcome to another year, another opportunity for gardening! Whatever your gardening interests and goals, perhaps you’ll discover inspiration from these 2014 trends, shared by Eva Monheim, a published writer and horticulture professor at Temple University in Philadelphia.

Fruits and nuts

 The American filbert tree provides tasty hazelnuts that are prized by people and wildlife. photo by Eva Monheim.

The American filbert tree provides tasty hazelnuts that are prized by people and wildlife. photo by Eva Monheim.


A tasty trend topping the list is homegrown fruits and nuts. Backyard gardeners are trying their luck with traditional and hybrid varieties of strawberries, blueberries and grapes. While some experiment with exotics, such as China’s hardy kiwi, others focus on yesteryear’s elderberries, mulberries, pawpaws and persimmons. Garden centers and nurseries also face increased demand for trees that produce hazelnuts, walnuts and pecans.
Active education

A medicinal herb garden at Temple University in Philadelphia engages the community as it teaches medical students about healing plants. Photo by Eva Monheim.

A medicinal herb garden at Temple University in Philadelphia engages the community as it teaches medical students about healing plants. Photo by Eva Monheim.

With new advocates comes their desire to learn. There’s a growing tendency for working alongside garden mentors and gleaning tips from horticulture classes, online blogs and mobile apps. Today’s gardeners are passionate about knowing and doing what’s best for the crops and environment.
Livestock labor

Goats and sheep are welcomed by some cities and suburbs to help control invasive plants. Photo by Eva Monheim.

Goats and sheep are welcomed by some cities and suburbs to help control invasive plants. Photo by Eva Monheim.

Forget chemicals and extra manpower. When local codes allow, try sheep and goats for removal of invasive plants. Savvy neighborhood co-ops also pool their resources for chickens that lay fresh eggs and eat pests, such as ticks, mosquitoes, and larvae of mosquitoes and other insects.
New advocates

Janet Rasmussen of Madison, WI photographs some of the orchids at the "Orchids Galore" exhibit in the Conservatory at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, March 29, 2013.She is in Richmond visiting a relative. On the left is a "Golden Treasure" moth orchid. Lewis Ginter has been recognized as one of the "Top 10 American Gardens Worth Traveling For." Photo by P. Kevin Morely.

Janet Rasmussen of Madison, WI photographs orchids, including ‘Golden Treasure’ moth orchid in the Conservatory at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in March 2013. Lewis Ginter has been recognized as one of the “Top 10 American Gardens Worth Traveling For.” Photo by P. Kevin Morely.

Visitation continues to grow at botanical gardens and arboretums. “More people are being hooked into gardening — not directly by the plants, but by another part of the venue that attracts them in an indirect way,” Monheim said. When people attend a botanical garden’s outdoor concert or third-party event with family and friends, they may sense something bigger and become more mindful of the world around them. “They shift from ‘me, me, me’ to ‘how can I change things for a better environment in a larger context?’ ”
Repurposed land

harvesting basil

Youth volunteer workers harvesting basil from an area behind the Conservatory at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden that used to be planted with grass. Photo by Jonah Holland.

In Richmond and beyond, urbanites are transforming vacant lots into sustainable community gardens. Local volunteers and neighborhood residents work together to reap fresh vegetables and herbs, as well as hands-on training and newfound relationships. “There’s cross-generational education with the young teaching the old and the middle-aged teaching the young,” Monheim said. “It’s really fascinating — there’s no age limit when you go into a garden.”
Food foraging

stir fried bamboo

One way of reducing invasive bamboo is to cut and eat it. Photo by Eva Monheim

“It’s very chic to not have to pay for food,” Monheim said, so more individuals and special-interest groups are scouring the wild for edibles. From mushrooms and blackberries to bamboo and goutweed, they harvest nature’s bounty for their next meal. “Foragers want to see how much they can save, but they need to be careful and know what they’re doing,” Monheim cautioned.
Health and Income

Leonard Morrow, left, shows Thomas Jefferson high school students Yasmin Nolan, 16, center, and Deonte' Terry, 17, some of the plants in the garden across for the school, in Richmond, Va.  (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Alexa Welch Edlund)

Leonard Morrow, left, shows Thomas Jefferson high school students Yasmin Nolan, 16, center, and Deonte’ Terry, 17, some of the plants in the garden across for the school, in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Alexa Welch Edlund)

“It’s a healthy-eating scene now,” Monheim said, and urban gardens offer informal tastings of nutritious produce for neighbors who don’t necessarily have healthful eating as a focus. “They taste new things and like them, then they tell others.” Some urban gardeners take the trend one step further by creating garden co-ops for revenue production. “It’s an entrepreneur opportunity at a basic level,” Monheim said.

Pat Carrier's woodland garden in Goochland County. Photographed Tues. May 9, 2006. Photo by Mark Gormus.

Pat Carrier’s woodland garden in Goochland County. Photographed Tues. May 9, 2006. Photo by Mark Gormus.

Gardening: Growing trends
Inactive woodland gardens welcome visitors to pause and rest, while active woodlands encourage exploration. They also perform double duty when providing flood control, havens for wildlife and reductions in high-maintenance lawns. “The goal with woodland gardens is a good mix of plants and a very healthy growth from ceiling to floor.” Monheim recommends blending evergreens with mosses and woodland bulbs for seasonal interest.
Editor’s Note: This article first published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch, in January 2014.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »